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Hydrogen Damage

Hydrogen Damage - includes more than one type of failure mode, and occurs because Atomic Hydrogen (H) is small enough to penetrate a metal lattice.


Hydrogen Damage is also termed Hydrogen Induced Cracking (HIC). HIC is a brittle failure mode resulting from the ingress of hydrogen into the metal lattice. Cracks tend to be non-branched, and degradation may be exacerbated by Cathodic Polarization.

Another form of Hydrogen Damage is termed the
Hydrogen Blister. As Atomic Hydrogen (H) penetrates a metal lattice, it is sometimes trapped inside. When other hydrogen atoms accumulate at the same point, they may interact and form Hydrogen Gas (H2). Hydrogen Gas is not small enough to penetrate the lattice, and so becomes trapped and can form a hydrogen blister within the metal.

It may be possible to reverse the effect of hydrogen by baking the metal to permit the hydrogen to escape.


Hydrogen Damage - includes more than one type of failure mode, and occurs because Atomic Hydrogen (H) is small enough to penetrate a metal lattice.

Hydrogen Damage is also termed Hydrogen Induced Cracking (HIC). HIC is a brittle failure mode resulting from the ingress of hydrogen into the metal lattice. Cracks tend to be non-branched, and degradation may be exacerbated by Cathodic Polarization.

Another form of Hydrogen Damage is termed the
Hydrogen Blister. As Atomic Hydrogen (H) penetrates a metal lattice, it is sometimes trapped inside. When other hydrogen atoms accumulate at the same point, they may interact and form Hydrogen Gas (H2). Hydrogen Gas is not small enough to penetrate the lattice, and so becomes trapped and can form a hydrogen blister within the metal.

It may be possible to reverse the effect of hydrogen by baking the metal to permit the hydrogen to escape.


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